Nenagh Guardian. 29. 04 1908.

The Munster Gaelic Championship.Dungarvan was on Sunday the scene of two of two great Gaelic contests. They were brought off to decide who should be champions of Munster in the All-Ireland struggle. The combinations were Tipperary and Cork.

Hurling.

Cork 1-6  Tipperary 1-4.

Not for many years has so much interest centred on a hurling contest in the South as in this game between the Dungourney men, who are tried and proved champions of Cork City and County, and the Thurles men, who in a trial game a short while back proved themselves worthy of the confidence reposed in them. The Dungourney team, who hail from a parish near Midleton, had the willing assistance of the pick of other clubs, and the combination was, in truth, a powerful one.

The game very quickly became a “live”. Cork opened by rushing on Tipperary territory, but were beaten off, and then the Thurles men within five minutes of the start had shot a point to their credit. There was another ten minutes of warm work and Tipperary got their second point. Then Cork had an innings. Their first score was a goal put through by Hennessy, this was followed by a point by the same side. Just before the interval Cork lashed through another point, and thus led at half-time by 1 goal and 2 points to 2 points.

The second period was a desperate time. Cork made a rush to their opponent’s goal, but the keeper averted a score, and back the leather came to the Cork side, where a grand resistance was made. Soon after O’Keeffe added a point for Cork. Tipperary made a splendid defence, and Cork rarely missed scoring when the chance offered. A couple of chances were missed by Tipperary, and Cork put on point after point till when within ten minutes of full time they had a substantial lead. Then Tipperary pulled themselves together, and some of the finest hurling ever seen was witnessed. Amid tremendous excitement Tipperary put through a goal, and soon after added a point, thus getting within two points of their opponent’s figures. Play was desperately fast when M. O’Brien, of Tipperary, got hurt from a blow of a hurley on the head. He bled profusely, but still he gamely played on. Tipperary were showing too much advantage as the whistle sounded at close of time, leaving the score as above.